Brown hair color

by on 20.04.2018

Please forward this error screen to 209. This article needs brown hair color citations for verification. Brown hair is the second most common human hair color, after black hair.

It varies from light brown to almost black hair. Scotland, particularly in rural areas, and is also the word for “brown” in the Scandinavian languages. In modern English usage, however, it has lost the diminutive meaning and usually refers to any brown- or black-haired girl or woman, or the associated hair color. Rather, one would say, “She has light-brown hair. Brown-haired individuals predominate in most parts of Europe.

In northern and central Europe medium to light brown shades are the most common, while darker shades prevail in the rest of the continent, especially in the Iberian Peninsula, where it transitions into black hair. Similarly to blond hair, brown hair occurs commonly among Australian Aborigine and Melanesian populations. Dark brown hair is predominant in the Mediterranean parts of Europe, the Middle East, Central Asia, Central Africa and in parts of South Asia. It may occasionally be found among Indigenous Siberians and Americans, particularly when they are young, as well as in many other groups. The pigment eumelanin gives brown hair its distinctive color. Brown hair has more eumelanin than blond hair but also has far less than black. There are two different types of eumelanin, which are distinguished from each other by their pattern of polymer bonds.

Brown-haired people are thought to produce more skin-protecting eumelanin and are associated with having a more even skin tone. The range of skin colors associated with brown hair is vast, ranging from the palest of skin tones to a dark olive complexion. In Western popular culture, a common stereotype is that brunettes are stable, serious, smart and sophisticated. A British study into hair color and the intensity of attraction found that 62 percent of the men participating in the study associated brown-haired women with stability and competence. Brunettes were described as independent and self-sufficient by 67 percent of the men, and as intelligent by 81 percent. Anita Loos, the author of the novel and play Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, wrote a sequel entitled But Gentlemen Marry Brunettes. The Lady of Shalott from Lord Tennyson’s poem is depicted as a brunette in most paintings.