Professional hair color

by on 03.05.2018

Please forward this error screen to sharedip-10718041227. Professional hair color forward this error screen to sharedip-10718035114. See that long list of ingredients on the back of the bottle?

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Since not all manufacturers disclose their products ingredients online, some products may be missing from the database. If you have purchased a product not currently in the database and have the package or label handy, consider creating a provisional report to see how the product may score in Skin Deep. The provisional report scores are estimated and are not reviewed by EWG staff. EWG provides information on personal care product ingredients from the published scientific literature, to supplement incomplete data available from companies and the government. The ratings below indicate the relative level of concern posed by exposure to the ingredients in this product – not the product itself – compared to other product formulations. For hair color of horses, see Equine coat color. For hair colorants, see Hair coloring.

A variety of the human hair colors. From top left, clockwise: black, brown, blonde, white, red. Hair color is the pigmentation of hair follicles due to two types of melanin: eumelanin and pheomelanin. This section does not cite any sources. Two types of pigment give hair its color: eumelanin and pheomelanin. Pheomelanin colors hair orange and red.

All humans have some pheomelanin in their hair. Pheomelanin is more bio-chemically stable than black eumelanin, but less bio-chemically stable than brown eumelanin, so it breaks down more slowly when oxidized. This is why bleach gives darker hair a reddish tinge during the artificial coloring process. As the pheomelanin continues to break down, the hair will gradually become red, then orange, then yellow, and finally white. The genetics of hair colors are not yet firmly established.

According to one theory, at least two gene pairs control human hair color. A person with two copies of the red-haired allele will have red hair. Several gene pairs control the light versus dark hair color in a cumulative effect. Black hair is the darkest hair color. It has large amounts of eumelanin and is less dense than other hair colors. Brown hair is characterized by higher levels of eumelanin and lower levels of pheomelanin.

Brown-haired girls or women are often known as brunette. Chestnut hair is a hair color which is a reddish shade of brown hair. In contrast to auburn hair, the reddish shade of chestnut is darker. Chestnut hair is common among the native peoples of Northern, Central, Western, and Eastern Europe. Strawberry blond, a mixture of blond and red hair, is a much rarer type containing the most pheomelanin. Blond hair can have almost any proportion of pheomelanin and eumelanin, but has only small amounts of both.